DOI

10.17077/aseenmw2014.1032

Location

Lucus Dodge Room, 256 IMU

Start Date

10-17-2014 2:54 PM

End Date

10-17-2014 3:12 PM

Abstract

The framework guiding the development of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) identifies eight science and engineering principles essential for all students to learn. The Engineering the Future workshop, offered by South Dakota State University (SDSU) in the summer of 2012, focused on helping teachers better understand those principles and how to employ them effectively in their classrooms. Each day of the week-long workshop, teachers participated in a variety of engineering-related activities, accessed low and high-end instrumentation, took tours of engineering-related facilities in the region, and developed lesson plans to incorporate what they learned into their science classrooms. We used pre- and postworkshop surveys to assess the participants’ understanding and attitudes regarding science and engineering. Results of the survey showed participants had a narrow view of engineering prior to the workshop but by the end of the workshop, they were more aware of the nature of engineering, the various types of engineering, and they better understood how they could incorporate engineering principles into their current curriculum.

Rights

Copyright © 2014, Suzette R. Burckhard, Judy Vondruska, Kenneth Emo, Stephen Gent, Erin Cortus, Christopher Hay, and Zach Gutzmer

Share

COinS
 
Oct 17th, 2:54 PM Oct 17th, 3:12 PM

Engineering the Future: A Workshop for High School Teachers

Lucus Dodge Room, 256 IMU

The framework guiding the development of Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) identifies eight science and engineering principles essential for all students to learn. The Engineering the Future workshop, offered by South Dakota State University (SDSU) in the summer of 2012, focused on helping teachers better understand those principles and how to employ them effectively in their classrooms. Each day of the week-long workshop, teachers participated in a variety of engineering-related activities, accessed low and high-end instrumentation, took tours of engineering-related facilities in the region, and developed lesson plans to incorporate what they learned into their science classrooms. We used pre- and postworkshop surveys to assess the participants’ understanding and attitudes regarding science and engineering. Results of the survey showed participants had a narrow view of engineering prior to the workshop but by the end of the workshop, they were more aware of the nature of engineering, the various types of engineering, and they better understood how they could incorporate engineering principles into their current curriculum.