Location

Aspen, Colorado, USA

Date

15-8-2001

Session

Technical Session 3 - Fatigue and Impairment

Abstract

This paper reports the results of a pilot study designed to evaluatethe effect of an energy drink on mental performance and driving. 24 healthysubjects were tested after consumption of a placebo or an energy drink in adouble-blind crossover study. Measures included a laboratory test of AdaptiveTracking (AT), and a simulated drive involved a 40 Km motorway route in anadvanced motion-based simulator. Self-report scales of sleepiness revealed asignificant difference between placebo and energy drink. Though both drinksprovided an alerting effect, both the level and duration of the effect observedafter consumption of the energy drink was greater. Performance on the AT taskwas significantly improved. This improvement in hand-eye coordination wasreflected in better lane-keeping performance in the simulated driving task.There was also a consistent tendency when the drivers drank placebo to driveslightly faster in traffic than when drinking the energy drink. Thesepreliminary findings, which demonstrate that consumption of even a relativelysmall volume (250ml) of an energy drink can have an effect on sleepiness, lanekeeping and speed choice in simulated traffic, could have implications forfuture highway safety.

Rights

Copyright © 2001 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the First International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, 14-17 August 2001, Aspen, Colorado. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, of Iowa, 2001: 70-75.

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Aug 15th, 12:00 AM

An Evaluation of the Effects of a Functional Energy Drink on Post-lunch and Early Evening Driving Performance

Aspen, Colorado, USA

This paper reports the results of a pilot study designed to evaluatethe effect of an energy drink on mental performance and driving. 24 healthysubjects were tested after consumption of a placebo or an energy drink in adouble-blind crossover study. Measures included a laboratory test of AdaptiveTracking (AT), and a simulated drive involved a 40 Km motorway route in anadvanced motion-based simulator. Self-report scales of sleepiness revealed asignificant difference between placebo and energy drink. Though both drinksprovided an alerting effect, both the level and duration of the effect observedafter consumption of the energy drink was greater. Performance on the AT taskwas significantly improved. This improvement in hand-eye coordination wasreflected in better lane-keeping performance in the simulated driving task.There was also a consistent tendency when the drivers drank placebo to driveslightly faster in traffic than when drinking the energy drink. Thesepreliminary findings, which demonstrate that consumption of even a relativelysmall volume (250ml) of an energy drink can have an effect on sleepiness, lanekeeping and speed choice in simulated traffic, could have implications forfuture highway safety.