Location

Aspen, Colorado, USA

Date

15-8-2001

Session

Poster Session 1

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different vehicle controllers on driver performance in a simulated tank driving task. Eight male civilian volunteers with normal visual acuity drove a simulated tank on a digitized road terrain. The subject monitored his speed by means of a speedometer shown on the monitor. Independent variables were driving controller (joystick, or steering wheel with attached brake and accelerator pedal), and assigned driving speed of 15 or 45 mph (the maximum speed at which the subject was permitted to travel). Dependent variables were mean driving speed (the average speed at which the subject actually drove), and the proportion of time the center of the vehicle remained on the road during travel. Results indicated that subjects using the steering wheel obtained a significantly greater mean driving speed than those using the joystick only when they were permitted to drive a maximum speed of 45 mph. This difference may have little practical significance because the mean driving speed for the two controllers differed by less than 5 mph. There was no significant difference between controllers for the proportion of time the driver was able to keep the center of the vehicle on the road. Results implied that joystick controls have potential as an alternative control technology, and that the ergonomic placement of the joystick could be an important factor in enhancing driver performance.

Rights

Copyright © 2001 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the First International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, 14-17 August 2001, Aspen, Colorado. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, of Iowa, 2001: 143-146.

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Aug 15th, 12:00 AM

The Effect of a Vehicle Control Device on Driver Performance in a Simulated Tank Driving Task

Aspen, Colorado, USA

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different vehicle controllers on driver performance in a simulated tank driving task. Eight male civilian volunteers with normal visual acuity drove a simulated tank on a digitized road terrain. The subject monitored his speed by means of a speedometer shown on the monitor. Independent variables were driving controller (joystick, or steering wheel with attached brake and accelerator pedal), and assigned driving speed of 15 or 45 mph (the maximum speed at which the subject was permitted to travel). Dependent variables were mean driving speed (the average speed at which the subject actually drove), and the proportion of time the center of the vehicle remained on the road during travel. Results indicated that subjects using the steering wheel obtained a significantly greater mean driving speed than those using the joystick only when they were permitted to drive a maximum speed of 45 mph. This difference may have little practical significance because the mean driving speed for the two controllers differed by less than 5 mph. There was no significant difference between controllers for the proportion of time the driver was able to keep the center of the vehicle on the road. Results implied that joystick controls have potential as an alternative control technology, and that the ergonomic placement of the joystick could be an important factor in enhancing driver performance.