Location

Aspen, Colorado, USA

Date

16-8-2001

Session

Poster Session 2

Abstract

Jordan’s fatality rate per registered vehicle is approximately 7.5 times larger than that of the United States (157.2 per 100,000 in Jordan vs 21.0 per 100,000 in the U.S.). This project addresses the traffic safety problem in Jordan by evaluating driver’s knowledge of existing traffic laws and regulations. An experiment was conducted in which 55 subjects with current driver’s licenses were administered a test composed of 25 questions selected from actual Jordanian driver’s license exams. Statistical analyses were then conducted on the results. It was found that a shocking 96.4% of the drivers in this study failed to pass the simulated written driver’s license exam, with professional drivers scoring worse than non-professional drivers. Based on the findings, recommendations are made regarding Jordanian public policy governing driver’s licensing, including more frequent retesting of drivers, a higher standard of knowledge for traffic rules, and a nationwide program to assess the relationship between driver knowledge, driver behavior, and crash and fatality rates.

Rights

Copyright © 2001 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the First International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, 14-17 August 2001, Aspen, Colorado. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, of Iowa, 2001: 314-319.

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Aug 16th, 12:00 AM

Investigating Drivers' Traffic Knowledge in Jordan

Aspen, Colorado, USA

Jordan’s fatality rate per registered vehicle is approximately 7.5 times larger than that of the United States (157.2 per 100,000 in Jordan vs 21.0 per 100,000 in the U.S.). This project addresses the traffic safety problem in Jordan by evaluating driver’s knowledge of existing traffic laws and regulations. An experiment was conducted in which 55 subjects with current driver’s licenses were administered a test composed of 25 questions selected from actual Jordanian driver’s license exams. Statistical analyses were then conducted on the results. It was found that a shocking 96.4% of the drivers in this study failed to pass the simulated written driver’s license exam, with professional drivers scoring worse than non-professional drivers. Based on the findings, recommendations are made regarding Jordanian public policy governing driver’s licensing, including more frequent retesting of drivers, a higher standard of knowledge for traffic rules, and a nationwide program to assess the relationship between driver knowledge, driver behavior, and crash and fatality rates.