Location

Park City, Utah

Date

24-7-2003

Session

Session 9 - Lectures - (Driver Characteristics and Behavior)

Abstract

The objective of this study was to explore whether measures of visual and cognitive performance in a safe computerized driving environment were associated with collision involvement and the cost of collisions in a sample of professional motor vehicle operators. One hundred and nine (109) school bus drivers in a large metropolitan area were asked to take a 15-minute interactive computer-based driving assessment. The skills included visual target identification, scanning in four directions, divided-attention, reaction time, steering smoothness, false positive responses, and evasive maneuvers. An overall score validated in previous research summarized each driver’s performance. Each driver’s collision history over the last three years was then compared to the driving assessment scores. Collision data included collision type, frequency, and damage cost associated with each incident. Drivers with collisions (n = 27) were compared to drivers with no collisions (n = 82). Drivers with collisions had significantly lower overall scanning and steering smoothness scores than drivers without collisions. Drivers with collisions also had significantly higher braking and target false-positive scores, indicating disorientation. The total cost of collisions for the lower 40th percentile test scores was $42,261, whereas the cost for the upper 60th percentile was $10,314. The results indicate that drivers who are prone to become disoriented and overwhelmed in a high-demand computerized assessment were more likely to have had collisions on the road. The relationship between collision cost/incidence and test scores suggests that a sufficiently complex and rapidly paced computerized assessment has utility in identifying drivers who would benefit from remedial training.

Rights

Copyright © 2003 the authors

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Second International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, July 21-24, 2003, Park City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, of Iowa, 2003: 251-257.

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Jul 24th, 12:00 AM

The Relationship Between Collision History and a Computerized Assessment of Visual and Cognitive Skills in a Sample of School Bus Drivers

Park City, Utah

The objective of this study was to explore whether measures of visual and cognitive performance in a safe computerized driving environment were associated with collision involvement and the cost of collisions in a sample of professional motor vehicle operators. One hundred and nine (109) school bus drivers in a large metropolitan area were asked to take a 15-minute interactive computer-based driving assessment. The skills included visual target identification, scanning in four directions, divided-attention, reaction time, steering smoothness, false positive responses, and evasive maneuvers. An overall score validated in previous research summarized each driver’s performance. Each driver’s collision history over the last three years was then compared to the driving assessment scores. Collision data included collision type, frequency, and damage cost associated with each incident. Drivers with collisions (n = 27) were compared to drivers with no collisions (n = 82). Drivers with collisions had significantly lower overall scanning and steering smoothness scores than drivers without collisions. Drivers with collisions also had significantly higher braking and target false-positive scores, indicating disorientation. The total cost of collisions for the lower 40th percentile test scores was $42,261, whereas the cost for the upper 60th percentile was $10,314. The results indicate that drivers who are prone to become disoriented and overwhelmed in a high-demand computerized assessment were more likely to have had collisions on the road. The relationship between collision cost/incidence and test scores suggests that a sufficiently complex and rapidly paced computerized assessment has utility in identifying drivers who would benefit from remedial training.