Location

Rockport, Maine

Date

28-6-2005

Session

SESSION 3 - Poster Session A

Abstract

Lateral Drift Warning (LDW) and Curve Speed Warning (CSW)systems were developed to address two main critical events in run-off-roadcrashes, which are road edge departure and excessive speed. The LDW systemused a two-stage alert system, with the first stage activating when the driverdeparted a lane with a dashed boundary and the imminent, or second stage, whendeparting a lane with a solid boundary. The CSW also employed a two-stage alert,with the level based on the degree of over-speed for the upcoming curve. Thehaptic modality, in the form of seat vibration, was chosen as the first levelwarning for both systems, and auditory was chosen as the second or most urgentlevel. The two systems were installed in a fleet of instrumented vehicles andloaned to 78 randomly selected licensed drivers for approximately 4 weeks.Debriefing questions detailing the driver’s experience with the system wereadministered and analyzed in a two by two design of modality by system. Afterexamination of both the statistical results and the open-ended comments, thequestion of which modality is most appropriate is still uncertain. Each modalityhad positive aspects. Haptic does not alert the entire car and participants alsoconsidered it less distracting. Auditory provided better recognition betweenwarnings and participants were better able to understand the meaning and therequired response for each warning.

Rights

Copyright © 2005 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Third International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2005, Rockport, Maine. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2005: 218-224.

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Jun 28th, 12:00 AM

Assessment of a Driver Interface for Lateral Drift and Curve Speed Warning Systems: Mixed Results for Auditory and Haptic Warnings

Rockport, Maine

Lateral Drift Warning (LDW) and Curve Speed Warning (CSW)systems were developed to address two main critical events in run-off-roadcrashes, which are road edge departure and excessive speed. The LDW systemused a two-stage alert system, with the first stage activating when the driverdeparted a lane with a dashed boundary and the imminent, or second stage, whendeparting a lane with a solid boundary. The CSW also employed a two-stage alert,with the level based on the degree of over-speed for the upcoming curve. Thehaptic modality, in the form of seat vibration, was chosen as the first levelwarning for both systems, and auditory was chosen as the second or most urgentlevel. The two systems were installed in a fleet of instrumented vehicles andloaned to 78 randomly selected licensed drivers for approximately 4 weeks.Debriefing questions detailing the driver’s experience with the system wereadministered and analyzed in a two by two design of modality by system. Afterexamination of both the statistical results and the open-ended comments, thequestion of which modality is most appropriate is still uncertain. Each modalityhad positive aspects. Haptic does not alert the entire car and participants alsoconsidered it less distracting. Auditory provided better recognition betweenwarnings and participants were better able to understand the meaning and therequired response for each warning.