Location

Rockport, Maine

Date

29-6-2005

Session

SESSION 7 - Poster Session B

Abstract

An experimental study was conducted to determine if intersection behavior of those 18 to 24 and 65+ benefited from advanced in-vehicle signs presented in a head-up display (HUD) format. The University of Calgary Driving Simulator (UCDS) was used to determine whether intersection performance improved in the presence of several advanced signs or whether unwanted adaptive behaviors occurred (e.g., increasing speed to run the light instead of stopping). Invehicle signs facilitated an increase in stopping occurrences for both younger and older drivers at intersections with relatively short yellow onsets. In addition, eye movement analysis revealed significant age effects with regard to vertical and horizontal gaze variablity, with younger drivers showing increases in vertical gaze variability compared to the older drivers. Younger drivers also looked more often and had longer percentage of durations fixating on the HUD compared to the older drivers.

Rights

Copyright © 2005 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Third International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2005, Rockport, Maine. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2005: 356-362.

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Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

Do In-Vehicle Advance Signs Benefit Older and Younger Driver Intersection Performance?

Rockport, Maine

An experimental study was conducted to determine if intersection behavior of those 18 to 24 and 65+ benefited from advanced in-vehicle signs presented in a head-up display (HUD) format. The University of Calgary Driving Simulator (UCDS) was used to determine whether intersection performance improved in the presence of several advanced signs or whether unwanted adaptive behaviors occurred (e.g., increasing speed to run the light instead of stopping). Invehicle signs facilitated an increase in stopping occurrences for both younger and older drivers at intersections with relatively short yellow onsets. In addition, eye movement analysis revealed significant age effects with regard to vertical and horizontal gaze variablity, with younger drivers showing increases in vertical gaze variability compared to the older drivers. Younger drivers also looked more often and had longer percentage of durations fixating on the HUD compared to the older drivers.