Location

Rockport, Maine

Date

29-6-2005

Session

SESSION 7 - Poster Session B

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of sensationseeking and attention in traffic violations and errors. Participants were 716volunteer male drivers from Ankara, Turkey. Drivers were asked to respond tocomputerized measures of monotonous and selective attention tests, and also tocomplete the Driver Behavior Questionnaire, Driving Skills Inventory, and ArnettInventory of Sensation Seeking. We first categorized participants into four groupsaccording to their correct responses of monotonous and selective attention tests byusing median-split: Group 1 = low scores on both monotonous and selectiveattention tests, Group 2 = high scores on both monotonous and selective attentiontests, Group 3 = low on monotonous attention and high on selective attention, andGroup 4 = high on monotonous attention and low on selective attention.Participants were also classified into two groups regarding their total sensationseeking scores as low and high sensation seekers. A 4 (attention groups) X 2(sensation seeking groups) MANOVA was conducted on traffic violations anderrors as dependent variables. MANOVA analysis indicated that high sensationseekers with high monotonous and selective attention are more likely to have ahigher number of traffic violations and errors than other groups. Since thesedrivers also reported lower levels of safety skills than other groups, it could beinterpreted as an indication of drivers’ overconfidence in their skills andunderestimation of the hazards in traffic. Such drivers were more likely to be risktakers in traffic situations.

Rights

Copyright © 2005 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Third International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2005, Rockport, Maine. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2005: 395-402.

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Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

Traffic Violations and Errors: The Effects of Sensation Seeking and Attention

Rockport, Maine

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of sensationseeking and attention in traffic violations and errors. Participants were 716volunteer male drivers from Ankara, Turkey. Drivers were asked to respond tocomputerized measures of monotonous and selective attention tests, and also tocomplete the Driver Behavior Questionnaire, Driving Skills Inventory, and ArnettInventory of Sensation Seeking. We first categorized participants into four groupsaccording to their correct responses of monotonous and selective attention tests byusing median-split: Group 1 = low scores on both monotonous and selectiveattention tests, Group 2 = high scores on both monotonous and selective attentiontests, Group 3 = low on monotonous attention and high on selective attention, andGroup 4 = high on monotonous attention and low on selective attention.Participants were also classified into two groups regarding their total sensationseeking scores as low and high sensation seekers. A 4 (attention groups) X 2(sensation seeking groups) MANOVA was conducted on traffic violations anderrors as dependent variables. MANOVA analysis indicated that high sensationseekers with high monotonous and selective attention are more likely to have ahigher number of traffic violations and errors than other groups. Since thesedrivers also reported lower levels of safety skills than other groups, it could beinterpreted as an indication of drivers’ overconfidence in their skills andunderestimation of the hazards in traffic. Such drivers were more likely to be risktakers in traffic situations.