Location

Rockport, Maine

Date

30-6-2005

Session

SESSION 9 - Lectures Driver Distraction & Response

Abstract

An autonomic space model of sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart has been proposed as a method of deciphering psychological-physiological mappings for driving-related tasks. In the current study, we explore the utility of the autonomic space model for deciphering mappings in a driving simulation environment by comparing a single-task driving-only condition to two dual-task, driving-with-a-secondary-workingmemory task conditions. Although limited by a small sample size, the results illustrate the advantages physiological measures can have over performance measures for detecting changes in the psychological process required for drivingrelated task performance. Future research will include a repetition of this same study with more subjects as well the collection of on-the-road autonomic nervous system data.

Rights

Copyright © 2005 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Third International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2005, Rockport, Maine. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2005: 493-498.

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Jun 30th, 12:00 AM

Deciphering Psychological-Physiological Mappings While Driving and Performing a Secondary Memory Task

Rockport, Maine

An autonomic space model of sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart has been proposed as a method of deciphering psychological-physiological mappings for driving-related tasks. In the current study, we explore the utility of the autonomic space model for deciphering mappings in a driving simulation environment by comparing a single-task driving-only condition to two dual-task, driving-with-a-secondary-workingmemory task conditions. Although limited by a small sample size, the results illustrate the advantages physiological measures can have over performance measures for detecting changes in the psychological process required for drivingrelated task performance. Future research will include a repetition of this same study with more subjects as well the collection of on-the-road autonomic nervous system data.