Location

Stevenson, Washington

Date

10-7-2007

Session

Session 4 – Posters

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of simulatorbased driving training on attentional performance after stroke. A further analysis of data was conducted from a randomized controlled trial in which the effect of simulator training and cognitive paper and pencil training to improve driving were compared. Performance in divided attention tasks before, during and after 15 hours of simulator-based training of general driving skills in 33 experimental participants were evaluated. Performance in divided attention tasks was assessed during navigation of a 5-km scenario with the divided attention tasks as the only event to respond to and another 13.5-km scenario that contained a good mixture of regular day to day traffic situations. There were significant improvements in mean response time to the divided attention tasks and time to complete the 5-km scenario. Significant decrease in mean response time, number of missed responses, collisions, pedestrians hit, total faults and run time and increase in number of correct responses were found in the 13.5-km scenario. Further analyses showed most improvements in the simulator assessments occurred between preand mid-training. Simulator-based training of driving skills positively impacted attentional performance. Findings in this study suggest that 10 hours of simulatorbased driving training after stroke is sufficient to realize meaningful benefits.

Rights

Copyright © 2007 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Fourth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, July 9-12, 2007, Stevenson, Washington. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2007: 112-118.

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Jul 10th, 12:00 AM

Training of Driving-Related Attentional Performance After Stroke Using a Driving Simulator

Stevenson, Washington

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of simulatorbased driving training on attentional performance after stroke. A further analysis of data was conducted from a randomized controlled trial in which the effect of simulator training and cognitive paper and pencil training to improve driving were compared. Performance in divided attention tasks before, during and after 15 hours of simulator-based training of general driving skills in 33 experimental participants were evaluated. Performance in divided attention tasks was assessed during navigation of a 5-km scenario with the divided attention tasks as the only event to respond to and another 13.5-km scenario that contained a good mixture of regular day to day traffic situations. There were significant improvements in mean response time to the divided attention tasks and time to complete the 5-km scenario. Significant decrease in mean response time, number of missed responses, collisions, pedestrians hit, total faults and run time and increase in number of correct responses were found in the 13.5-km scenario. Further analyses showed most improvements in the simulator assessments occurred between preand mid-training. Simulator-based training of driving skills positively impacted attentional performance. Findings in this study suggest that 10 hours of simulatorbased driving training after stroke is sufficient to realize meaningful benefits.