Location

Stevenson, Washington

Date

10-7-2007

Session

Session 4 – Posters

Abstract

Motion contrast thresholds for 0.4 cycle/degree drifting Gabor stimuli were assessed at 15-degrees eccentricity for 16 younger drivers (ages 24 to 42), and 15 older drivers (ages 65 to 84), using a temporal two-alternative forced choice staircase procedure. Two self-report questionnaires assessed detection failure accident risk—the Driver Perception Questionnaire (DPQ5), and an abridged Aging Driver Questionnaire (ADQ15). The UFOV® test battery was also administered. Mean peripheral motion contrast thresholds (PMCT) of younger and older participants were –39.3 dB and –33.8 dB, respectively. For younger drivers, the correlation between PMCT and DPQ5 scores was .62 (p<.01), and between DPQ5 and ADQ16 (new and validated self-report measures, respectively) was .59 (p<.01). For older drivers, correlation between PMCT and DPQ5 scores was .49 (p<.01), between DPQ5 and ADQ16 was .73 (p<.01), and between PMCT and age was .49 (p<.05). For drivers overall, correlation was .48 (p<.01) between PMCT and DPQ5 scores, .63 (p<.0001) between DPQ5 and ADQ16, and .69 (p<.0001) between PMCT and age. For drivers overall, correlation was .30 (p<.05) between UFOV1 and age, .67 (p<.0001) between UFOV2 and age, .56 (p<.001) between UFOV2 and PMCT, .80 (p<.0001) between UFOV3 and age, and .58 (p<.001) between UFOV3 and PMCT. Holding age constant, partial correlation of PMCT with DPQ5 was .55 (p<.001), and of PMCT with ADQ15 was .39 (p<.05). PMCT significantly predicted self-reported driving performance in a laboratory setting, and worsened significantly with age. PMCT assessment should be made practicable. Informing high-risk drivers may encourage appropriate risk reduction countermeasures.

Rights

Copyright © 2007 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Fourth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, July 9-12, 2007, Stevenson, Washington. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2007: 191-198.

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Jul 10th, 12:00 AM

Near Peripheral Motion Detection Threshold Predicts Detection Failure Accident Risk in Younger and Older Drivers

Stevenson, Washington

Motion contrast thresholds for 0.4 cycle/degree drifting Gabor stimuli were assessed at 15-degrees eccentricity for 16 younger drivers (ages 24 to 42), and 15 older drivers (ages 65 to 84), using a temporal two-alternative forced choice staircase procedure. Two self-report questionnaires assessed detection failure accident risk—the Driver Perception Questionnaire (DPQ5), and an abridged Aging Driver Questionnaire (ADQ15). The UFOV® test battery was also administered. Mean peripheral motion contrast thresholds (PMCT) of younger and older participants were –39.3 dB and –33.8 dB, respectively. For younger drivers, the correlation between PMCT and DPQ5 scores was .62 (p<.01), and between DPQ5 and ADQ16 (new and validated self-report measures, respectively) was .59 (p<.01). For older drivers, correlation between PMCT and DPQ5 scores was .49 (p<.01), between DPQ5 and ADQ16 was .73 (p<.01), and between PMCT and age was .49 (p<.05). For drivers overall, correlation was .48 (p<.01) between PMCT and DPQ5 scores, .63 (p<.0001) between DPQ5 and ADQ16, and .69 (p<.0001) between PMCT and age. For drivers overall, correlation was .30 (p<.05) between UFOV1 and age, .67 (p<.0001) between UFOV2 and age, .56 (p<.001) between UFOV2 and PMCT, .80 (p<.0001) between UFOV3 and age, and .58 (p<.001) between UFOV3 and PMCT. Holding age constant, partial correlation of PMCT with DPQ5 was .55 (p<.001), and of PMCT with ADQ15 was .39 (p<.05). PMCT significantly predicted self-reported driving performance in a laboratory setting, and worsened significantly with age. PMCT assessment should be made practicable. Informing high-risk drivers may encourage appropriate risk reduction countermeasures.