Location

Stevenson, Washington

Date

10-7-2007

Session

Session 1 – Lectures Tools-Simulation - Research Methods

Abstract

The Lane Change Test (LCT) is an easy-to-implement, low-cost methodology for the evaluation of the distraction associated with performing invehicle tasks while driving (Mattes, 2003). In the present study, the LCT was used to assess driving performance when drivers completed navigation tasks using visual-manual or speech-based interfaces. Drivers performed two types of navigation tasks at two levels of difficulty. The results provide support for the LCT as an effective measure of distraction for both types of interface. It is recommended that the LCT procedure incorporate additional measures beyond the current mean deviation measure. Two measures are suggested: Lane Change Initiation, which reflects the aspects of driving having to do with detection and response delay as a result of distraction, and a measure of task duration to account for risk exposure.

Rights

Copyright © 2007 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Fourth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, July 9-12, 2007, Stevenson, Washington. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2007: 16-22.

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Jul 10th, 12:00 AM

Using the Lane-Change Test (LCT) to Assess Distraction: Tests of Visual-Manual and Speech-Based Operation of Navigation System Interfaces

Stevenson, Washington

The Lane Change Test (LCT) is an easy-to-implement, low-cost methodology for the evaluation of the distraction associated with performing invehicle tasks while driving (Mattes, 2003). In the present study, the LCT was used to assess driving performance when drivers completed navigation tasks using visual-manual or speech-based interfaces. Drivers performed two types of navigation tasks at two levels of difficulty. The results provide support for the LCT as an effective measure of distraction for both types of interface. It is recommended that the LCT procedure incorporate additional measures beyond the current mean deviation measure. Two measures are suggested: Lane Change Initiation, which reflects the aspects of driving having to do with detection and response delay as a result of distraction, and a measure of task duration to account for risk exposure.