Location

Big Sky, Montana

Date

23-6-2009

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

This study examines how older drivers responded to repeated exposures to a driver simulator. Older active and fit drivers participated in 5 simulator sessions within a 14-day period. For each session, simulator sickness symptoms were measured with the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire at baseline and post-session. In addition, participants completed a 10-cm visual analog scale (0= no symptom, 10= mild nausea) at baseline and after a familiarization scenario and post-session. Overall, older adults adapted to the driving simulator and by the fourth session, they showed no difference in sickness scores between the baseline and the post-session measurements. Increasing the exposure duration at session 5 yielded an increase in the sickness symptoms. These results suggest that shorterduration multiple exposures could reduce simulator sickness symptoms in elderly drivers and allow a more effective use of simulators for training by preventing early withdrawal of participants.

Rights

Copyright © 2009 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Fifth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2009, Big Sky, Montana. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2009: 169-175.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Multiple Exposition to a Driving Simulator Reduces Simulator Symptoms for Elderly Drivers

Big Sky, Montana

This study examines how older drivers responded to repeated exposures to a driver simulator. Older active and fit drivers participated in 5 simulator sessions within a 14-day period. For each session, simulator sickness symptoms were measured with the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire at baseline and post-session. In addition, participants completed a 10-cm visual analog scale (0= no symptom, 10= mild nausea) at baseline and after a familiarization scenario and post-session. Overall, older adults adapted to the driving simulator and by the fourth session, they showed no difference in sickness scores between the baseline and the post-session measurements. Increasing the exposure duration at session 5 yielded an increase in the sickness symptoms. These results suggest that shorterduration multiple exposures could reduce simulator sickness symptoms in elderly drivers and allow a more effective use of simulators for training by preventing early withdrawal of participants.