Location

Big Sky, Montana

Date

24-6-2009

Session

Session 4 – Hybrids Intro Lecture/Poster

Abstract

Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some of the aging manifestation that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there are suggestions that classroom programs do not allow to improve the driving performance of elderly drivers. The aim of this study was to evaluate if specific simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify on-road behaviors of elderly drivers. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the training, 10 elderly drivers who received feedback were tested before and after the training program with an on-road standardized evaluation. A control group (12 older drivers) also participated. Participants in this group received a classroom training program and similar exposure to driving in a simulator but without drivingspecific feedback. After attending the training program, the control group showed no modification of their driving performance (on-road score, frequency of successful turning maneuvers and frequency blind spot verification before lane change maneuvers). On the other hand, participants in the feedback group improved their driving skills for all maneuvers that were evaluated. These results suggest that simulator training transferred effectively to on-road performance. In order to be effective, driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving specific feedback.

Comments

Honda Outstanding Student Paper Award

Rights

Copyright © 2009 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Fifth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2009, Big Sky, Montana. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2009: 221-227.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

Multiple-Session Simulator Training for Older Drivers and On-Road Transfer of Learning

Big Sky, Montana

Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some of the aging manifestation that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there are suggestions that classroom programs do not allow to improve the driving performance of elderly drivers. The aim of this study was to evaluate if specific simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify on-road behaviors of elderly drivers. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the training, 10 elderly drivers who received feedback were tested before and after the training program with an on-road standardized evaluation. A control group (12 older drivers) also participated. Participants in this group received a classroom training program and similar exposure to driving in a simulator but without drivingspecific feedback. After attending the training program, the control group showed no modification of their driving performance (on-road score, frequency of successful turning maneuvers and frequency blind spot verification before lane change maneuvers). On the other hand, participants in the feedback group improved their driving skills for all maneuvers that were evaluated. These results suggest that simulator training transferred effectively to on-road performance. In order to be effective, driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving specific feedback.