Location

Big Sky, Montana

Date

24-6-2009

Session

Session 4 – Hybrids Intro Lecture/Poster

Abstract

To monitor novice driver performance in the first years of solo driving, a test aimed at assessing speed adaptation to the traffic situation was developed and evaluated. The Adaptation Test consisted of 18 traffic scenes presented in two (almost) identical photographs, which differed in one single detail, increasing the situation’s complexity. The difference in reported speed between the two pictures was used as an indication of drivers’ adaptation of speed to the complexity of the traffic situation. A previous study showed that novice, unsafe and overconfident drivers, as identified in an on-road driving assessment, performed worse on the Adaptation Test (i.e. less often reported a lower speed in the more complex situation). The analysis of new data in this paper shows no correlation between performance on the Adaptation Test and self-reported crashes, and that after two years, experienced drivers had improved their performance on the Adaptation Test just as much as novice drivers.

Rights

Copyright © 2009 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Fifth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2009, Big Sky, Montana. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2009: 299-305.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

The Adaption Test: The Development of a Method to Measure Speed Adaption to Traffic Complexity

Big Sky, Montana

To monitor novice driver performance in the first years of solo driving, a test aimed at assessing speed adaptation to the traffic situation was developed and evaluated. The Adaptation Test consisted of 18 traffic scenes presented in two (almost) identical photographs, which differed in one single detail, increasing the situation’s complexity. The difference in reported speed between the two pictures was used as an indication of drivers’ adaptation of speed to the complexity of the traffic situation. A previous study showed that novice, unsafe and overconfident drivers, as identified in an on-road driving assessment, performed worse on the Adaptation Test (i.e. less often reported a lower speed in the more complex situation). The analysis of new data in this paper shows no correlation between performance on the Adaptation Test and self-reported crashes, and that after two years, experienced drivers had improved their performance on the Adaptation Test just as much as novice drivers.