Location

Big Sky, Montana

Date

24-6-2009

Session

Session 6 – Lectures Medical Factors: Fitness to Drive

Abstract

The method of descending limits assessed motion contrast thresholds of 11 young participants (17–28), and 21 older drivers (63–86) for 0.4 cycle/degree drifting Gabor stimuli at 15 degrees eccentricity. Peripheral motion contrast thresholds (PMCT) of younger participants (M = –45.5 dB, SD = 1.66 dB) and older participants (M = –43.3 dB, SD = 3.79 dB) differed (t(29) = 2.295, p < .05 (all p-values one-tailed)). Older drivers performed UFOV® tests and a high-fidelity driving simulation. Between independent variables, significant correlations were PMCT with UFOV2 (r = .74, p < .001), PMCT with UFOV3 (r = .50, p < .01), PMCT with age (r =.73, p < .001), UFOV2 with age (r = .48, p < .05), and UFOV3 with age (r = .44, p < .05). Between vision and simulator measures, PMCT and UFOV2 significantly predicted rater’s simulator score (r = .66, p < .001; r = .58, p < .01 respectively), and simulator crashes ( r = .63, p < .001; r = .72, p < .001 respectively). Thus, PMCT and UFOV2 strongly predicted simulator performance. Partial correlations showed that: substantial association between PMCT and UFOV2 was not age–related; PMCT and UFOV2 tapped a common visual function; and PMCT assessed a component not captured by UFOV2. The descending limits procedure is as reliable and faster than forcedchoice. A practicable PMCT test that informs at-risk drivers about visual deficits may help them compensate effectively by learning voluntary scanning techniques and by otherwise modifying their driving techniques.

Rights

Copyright © 2009 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Fifth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2009, Big Sky, Montana. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2009: 334-341.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

Near Peripheral Motion Contrast Threshold Predicts Older Drivers' Driving Simulator Performance

Big Sky, Montana

The method of descending limits assessed motion contrast thresholds of 11 young participants (17–28), and 21 older drivers (63–86) for 0.4 cycle/degree drifting Gabor stimuli at 15 degrees eccentricity. Peripheral motion contrast thresholds (PMCT) of younger participants (M = –45.5 dB, SD = 1.66 dB) and older participants (M = –43.3 dB, SD = 3.79 dB) differed (t(29) = 2.295, p < .05 (all p-values one-tailed)). Older drivers performed UFOV® tests and a high-fidelity driving simulation. Between independent variables, significant correlations were PMCT with UFOV2 (r = .74, p < .001), PMCT with UFOV3 (r = .50, p < .01), PMCT with age (r =.73, p < .001), UFOV2 with age (r = .48, p < .05), and UFOV3 with age (r = .44, p < .05). Between vision and simulator measures, PMCT and UFOV2 significantly predicted rater’s simulator score (r = .66, p < .001; r = .58, p < .01 respectively), and simulator crashes ( r = .63, p < .001; r = .72, p < .001 respectively). Thus, PMCT and UFOV2 strongly predicted simulator performance. Partial correlations showed that: substantial association between PMCT and UFOV2 was not age–related; PMCT and UFOV2 tapped a common visual function; and PMCT assessed a component not captured by UFOV2. The descending limits procedure is as reliable and faster than forcedchoice. A practicable PMCT test that informs at-risk drivers about visual deficits may help them compensate effectively by learning voluntary scanning techniques and by otherwise modifying their driving techniques.