Location

Big Sky, Montana

Date

23-6-2009

Session

Session 2 – Lectures Commercial Vehicle Operations

Abstract

A small group of heavy vehicle drivers underwent an ecodrive training course. Their driving was assessed for various ecodrive variables as they completed an 18 mile circuit in normal traffic immediately after the course and again 6 and 12 weeks later. Compared to pre-course measures, these drivers reduced their fuel consumption by an average of 27%, the number of gear changes by 29%, and the number of brake applications by 41%, though not all differences were statistically significant due to the size of this pilot and large driver variability. Importantly, the improvements were not offset by increases in the time taken to complete the circuit. At the 6 week point a control group was also assessed, and they used more fuel and more gear changes, and applied their brakes more often than the control group. Safety variables were inconclusive. A larger, in-service trial is warranted.

Rights

Copyright © 2009 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Fifth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2009, Big Sky, Montana. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2009: 46-53.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Ecodrive Training Delivers Substantial Fuel Savings for Heavy Vehicle Drivers

Big Sky, Montana

A small group of heavy vehicle drivers underwent an ecodrive training course. Their driving was assessed for various ecodrive variables as they completed an 18 mile circuit in normal traffic immediately after the course and again 6 and 12 weeks later. Compared to pre-course measures, these drivers reduced their fuel consumption by an average of 27%, the number of gear changes by 29%, and the number of brake applications by 41%, though not all differences were statistically significant due to the size of this pilot and large driver variability. Importantly, the improvements were not offset by increases in the time taken to complete the circuit. At the 6 week point a control group was also assessed, and they used more fuel and more gear changes, and applied their brakes more often than the control group. Safety variables were inconclusive. A larger, in-service trial is warranted.