Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

28-6-2011

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

Work by Atchley and Chan (2011) reported that engaging in a concurrent verbal task might serve to alleviate performance decrements in drivers when vigilance was low. Building on previous findings, the current study investigated the potential benefits of a concurrent verbal task when drivers were likely to be fatigued due to the extended duration and monotony of a driving task. Driver performance was studied under distracted and non-distracted conditions. Results indicated that strategically engaging in a concurrent verbal task led to improved driving performance when fatigue was at its highest.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 151-157.

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Jun 28th, 12:00 AM

Potential Benefits of a Concurrent Verbal Task when Feeling Fatigued Due to Monotonous Driving Conditions

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Work by Atchley and Chan (2011) reported that engaging in a concurrent verbal task might serve to alleviate performance decrements in drivers when vigilance was low. Building on previous findings, the current study investigated the potential benefits of a concurrent verbal task when drivers were likely to be fatigued due to the extended duration and monotony of a driving task. Driver performance was studied under distracted and non-distracted conditions. Results indicated that strategically engaging in a concurrent verbal task led to improved driving performance when fatigue was at its highest.