Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

28-6-2011

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

Novice drivers in comparison to experienced drivers perform poorly due to incomplete mental models of roadway hazards. This paper describes the driving simulator scenario design methods used in a novice driver training study to detect a possible transfer of training for hazard perception. Applied in a high school driver education classroom, the data of trained versus un-trained drivers is presented for pre/post-test driving scenarios, N = 67. Results showed that while general simulator control performance between the trained and un-trained groups was similar, the trained group performed better at hazard events and exhibited fewer speeding behaviors at the post-test. Specific hazard encounters indicated that simulator training may have had an effect on performance even when the training group was not trained on the specific situation. Arguments for training transfer in hazard perception are presented.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 203-210.

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Jun 28th, 12:00 AM

Detecting Transfer of Training Through Simulator Scenario Design: A Novice 
Driver Training Study

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Novice drivers in comparison to experienced drivers perform poorly due to incomplete mental models of roadway hazards. This paper describes the driving simulator scenario design methods used in a novice driver training study to detect a possible transfer of training for hazard perception. Applied in a high school driver education classroom, the data of trained versus un-trained drivers is presented for pre/post-test driving scenarios, N = 67. Results showed that while general simulator control performance between the trained and un-trained groups was similar, the trained group performed better at hazard events and exhibited fewer speeding behaviors at the post-test. Specific hazard encounters indicated that simulator training may have had an effect on performance even when the training group was not trained on the specific situation. Arguments for training transfer in hazard perception are presented.