Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

29-6-2011

Session

Session 4 – Lectures Neurological Impairment & Fitness to Drive

Abstract

Symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), as well as medications, can influence safe driving. Some studies have shown that drivers with PD make more errors and may have more crashes. Although a few studies have suggested drivers with PD may self-regulate by reducing amount of driving and avoiding challenging situations, findings are based on self-report data. The purpose of this study was to objectively examine naturalistic driving exposure and patterns in drivers with PD compared to an age-matched group of healthy drivers using electronic, in-vehicle devices over a two week monitoring period. Compared to the controls, the PD group drove significantly less overall (number of trips, kilometres, duration), on weekends and at night. When adjusted for number of days of driving, the PD group still made fewer trips and drove proportionately less at night. This was the first study to examine the actual driving practices of a PD population using objective measures.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 263-269.

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Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

Using In-Vehicle Devices to Examine Exposure and Patterns in Drivers with Parkinson’s Disease Compared to an Age-Matched Control Group

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD), as well as medications, can influence safe driving. Some studies have shown that drivers with PD make more errors and may have more crashes. Although a few studies have suggested drivers with PD may self-regulate by reducing amount of driving and avoiding challenging situations, findings are based on self-report data. The purpose of this study was to objectively examine naturalistic driving exposure and patterns in drivers with PD compared to an age-matched group of healthy drivers using electronic, in-vehicle devices over a two week monitoring period. Compared to the controls, the PD group drove significantly less overall (number of trips, kilometres, duration), on weekends and at night. When adjusted for number of days of driving, the PD group still made fewer trips and drove proportionately less at night. This was the first study to examine the actual driving practices of a PD population using objective measures.