Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

29-6-2011

Session

Session 4 – Lectures Neurological Impairment & Fitness to Drive

Abstract

Poor performance on the Useful Field of View (UFOV® test) has been linked to negative driving outcomes, such as crashes. The UFOV® test was given to a sample of drivers 75+ years across the state of Alabama (N=2235) as a means of attaining a reduction in insurance rates if successful on the test. Results revealed that retrospectively, participants who failed the assessment were 1.65 times more likely to have an at-fault crash and 1.66 times more likely to have an at-fault insurance claim in the previous five years as compared to participants who passed the assessment. Prospectively, these same participants were 1.85 times more likely to have an at-fault crash and 2.73 times more likely to have an at-fault claim in the subsequent 1.29 years after assessment as compared to participants who passed the assessment. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first translational study to investigate the impact of offering an insurance discount for passing such an assessment on prospective at-fault crashes and at-fault insurance claims.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 270-276.

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Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

Translating Laboratory Measures to Real-World Outcomes: Application of the 
UFOV® Test in an Insurance Company Setting

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Poor performance on the Useful Field of View (UFOV® test) has been linked to negative driving outcomes, such as crashes. The UFOV® test was given to a sample of drivers 75+ years across the state of Alabama (N=2235) as a means of attaining a reduction in insurance rates if successful on the test. Results revealed that retrospectively, participants who failed the assessment were 1.65 times more likely to have an at-fault crash and 1.66 times more likely to have an at-fault insurance claim in the previous five years as compared to participants who passed the assessment. Prospectively, these same participants were 1.85 times more likely to have an at-fault crash and 2.73 times more likely to have an at-fault claim in the subsequent 1.29 years after assessment as compared to participants who passed the assessment. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first translational study to investigate the impact of offering an insurance discount for passing such an assessment on prospective at-fault crashes and at-fault insurance claims.