Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

29-6-2011

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

Older pedestrians are well known to be over-involved in road crashes compared to younger pedestrians. This study investigates the extent to which risky street-crossing decisions in older pedestrians can be explained by agerelated declines of cognitive, perceptual and physical abilities. Three age groups of participants (young, young-old, old-old) were evaluated in a street-crossing task and performed a series of functional tests. The results showed that agerelated slowing in walking speed as well as a decline in cognitive flexibility and in visual acuity play a substantial role in risky decisions by the elderly. The implications of these findings, particularly in the development of a mixed physical-cognitive training to enhance the older pedestrians’ road crossing decisions in complex environments, are discussed.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 409-416.

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Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

Cognitive, Perceptual and Motor Decline as Predictors of Risky Street-Crossing Decisions in Older Pedestrians

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Older pedestrians are well known to be over-involved in road crashes compared to younger pedestrians. This study investigates the extent to which risky street-crossing decisions in older pedestrians can be explained by agerelated declines of cognitive, perceptual and physical abilities. Three age groups of participants (young, young-old, old-old) were evaluated in a street-crossing task and performed a series of functional tests. The results showed that agerelated slowing in walking speed as well as a decline in cognitive flexibility and in visual acuity play a substantial role in risky decisions by the elderly. The implications of these findings, particularly in the development of a mixed physical-cognitive training to enhance the older pedestrians’ road crossing decisions in complex environments, are discussed.