DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1431

Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

29-6-2011

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

The current study investigated age-related differences in a steering control task under low visibility conditions. Younger and older drivers were presented with displays simulating forward vehicle motion through a 3D scene of random dots on a ground plane. The lateral position of the vehicle was perturbed by a simulated side wind gust according to a sum of sinusoidal functions. The drivers’ task was to steer the vehicle to maintain a straight path. The visibility of the driving scene was reduced by reducing the quantity and the quality of the optical flow field. We found that performance decreased when visibility was reduced for both older and younger drivers, with better performance for younger drivers as compared with older drivers. An age-related interaction was also found with deteriorated optical flow information. These results suggest that under reduced visibility conditions, older drivers may have increased accident risk due to decreased ability to successfully steer the vehicle.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 447-453.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

Aging and Steering Control Under Reduced Visibility Conditions

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

The current study investigated age-related differences in a steering control task under low visibility conditions. Younger and older drivers were presented with displays simulating forward vehicle motion through a 3D scene of random dots on a ground plane. The lateral position of the vehicle was perturbed by a simulated side wind gust according to a sum of sinusoidal functions. The drivers’ task was to steer the vehicle to maintain a straight path. The visibility of the driving scene was reduced by reducing the quantity and the quality of the optical flow field. We found that performance decreased when visibility was reduced for both older and younger drivers, with better performance for younger drivers as compared with older drivers. An age-related interaction was also found with deteriorated optical flow information. These results suggest that under reduced visibility conditions, older drivers may have increased accident risk due to decreased ability to successfully steer the vehicle.