Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

29-6-2011

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

The focus of the research was to address the crash avoidance behaviors of drivers versus motorcyclists. Avoidance tasks include, attention maintenance and hazard anticipation measured with glance behaviors, and hazard mitigation measured with response times and deceleration. Specifically, where might the driver behavior be similar or different than that of a motorcyclist? The performances of 23participants were analyzed while they drove a car and rode a motorcycle over the same low-volume, open roads. Participants wore eye-tracking equipment used to record eye-glance information while the motorcycle and car were instrumented with an on-board accelerometer and GPS apparatus. Operators also responded by braking quickly to a stop when an LED, mounted in front of them, was illuminated. Motorcyclists spent less time glancing toward the road ahead and made fewer last-glances toward the direction of most threatening traffic before turning when riding the motorcycle, as opposed to when driving a car. Additionally, motorcyclists’ response times were similar to those when driving, yet motorcyclists decelerated less sharply compared to drivers. These results suggest that riders may be exposing themselves to unnecessary risk. Specifically, motorcyclists frequently failed to make proper glances and practice optimal riding techniques. The implication of these results relative to a training curriculum is discussed.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 461-468.

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Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

Influence of Riding Experience on Glance Behavior, Brake Response Time and Deceleration Rates by Drivers and Motorcyclists

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

The focus of the research was to address the crash avoidance behaviors of drivers versus motorcyclists. Avoidance tasks include, attention maintenance and hazard anticipation measured with glance behaviors, and hazard mitigation measured with response times and deceleration. Specifically, where might the driver behavior be similar or different than that of a motorcyclist? The performances of 23participants were analyzed while they drove a car and rode a motorcycle over the same low-volume, open roads. Participants wore eye-tracking equipment used to record eye-glance information while the motorcycle and car were instrumented with an on-board accelerometer and GPS apparatus. Operators also responded by braking quickly to a stop when an LED, mounted in front of them, was illuminated. Motorcyclists spent less time glancing toward the road ahead and made fewer last-glances toward the direction of most threatening traffic before turning when riding the motorcycle, as opposed to when driving a car. Additionally, motorcyclists’ response times were similar to those when driving, yet motorcyclists decelerated less sharply compared to drivers. These results suggest that riders may be exposing themselves to unnecessary risk. Specifically, motorcyclists frequently failed to make proper glances and practice optimal riding techniques. The implication of these results relative to a training curriculum is discussed.