Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

29-6-2011

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

This study investigated the training effectiveness of continuous visual feedback in a simulator-based lane keeping task. Two groups of student drivers (total of 30 participants) were instructed to drive as accurately as possible in the center of the right lane in a self-paced driving task during five 8-min sessions. One group received visual feedback using a horizontal compensatory display positioned on the dashboard, which provided an indication of the momentary distance to the lane center during the three training sessions. During two retention sessions (immediate and one day delayed) both groups drove without the augmented feedback. The augmented feedback resulted in improved performance on a measure lane keeping accuracy, but this effect disappeared during retention. Furthermore, the augmented feedback resulted in increased steering wheel activity during all sessions, and increased driver workload in the delayed retention session. These results provide support for the guidance hypothesis and have possible implications for the use of continuous concurrent feedback in simulatorbased driver training.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 482-488.

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Jun 29th, 12:00 AM

Effects of Concurrent Continuous Visual Feedback on Learning the Lane Keeping Task

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

This study investigated the training effectiveness of continuous visual feedback in a simulator-based lane keeping task. Two groups of student drivers (total of 30 participants) were instructed to drive as accurately as possible in the center of the right lane in a self-paced driving task during five 8-min sessions. One group received visual feedback using a horizontal compensatory display positioned on the dashboard, which provided an indication of the momentary distance to the lane center during the three training sessions. During two retention sessions (immediate and one day delayed) both groups drove without the augmented feedback. The augmented feedback resulted in improved performance on a measure lane keeping accuracy, but this effect disappeared during retention. Furthermore, the augmented feedback resulted in increased steering wheel activity during all sessions, and increased driver workload in the delayed retention session. These results provide support for the guidance hypothesis and have possible implications for the use of continuous concurrent feedback in simulatorbased driver training.