Location

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Date

30-6-2011

Session

Session 8 – Hybrid Presentations

Abstract

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can lead to impairments in cognitive, physical, and psychosocial functions, which may ultimately affect an individual’s ability to drive. A systematic review was conducted to: 1) assess the impact of TBI on crash risk/driving performance; 2) determine what factors associated with TBI are predictive of increased crash risk/poor driving performance; and 3) determine if there is a likelihood of future seizure among individuals with a TBI who did not experience a seizure at the time of the injury. Results indicated that: 1) The available evidence is insufficient to determine whether crash risk is elevated for drivers with TBI compared to uninjured controls (Summary RR=1.32; 95% CI=0.77-2.25). However, driving performance was significantly impaired among individuals with TBI compared to uninjured controls (Strength of Evidence: Moderate); 2) Cognitive function measured by certain neuropsychological tests may predict the outcome of driving performance measured by a road test for patients with TBI. (Strength of Evidence: Moderate); and 3) Individuals with TBI who have not experienced a seizure within the first week post-injury still have a significant likelihood of experiencing late seizure(s). Frequencies of late seizures ranged from 1% to 25% during follow-up periods ranging from 1 to 11 years (Strength of Evidence: Moderate). The highest rate of late seizures (25%) was associated primarily with penetrating missile TBIs (Strength of Evidence: Minimally Acceptable [32% vs. 5%]). These findings have potential implications for regulatory agencies with responsibility for road safety.

Rights

Copyright © 2011 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Sixth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 27-30, 2011, Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2011: 547-554.

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Jun 30th, 12:00 AM

Traumatic Brain Injury and Driver Safety: A Systematic Review

Olympic Valley — Lake Tahoe, California

Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can lead to impairments in cognitive, physical, and psychosocial functions, which may ultimately affect an individual’s ability to drive. A systematic review was conducted to: 1) assess the impact of TBI on crash risk/driving performance; 2) determine what factors associated with TBI are predictive of increased crash risk/poor driving performance; and 3) determine if there is a likelihood of future seizure among individuals with a TBI who did not experience a seizure at the time of the injury. Results indicated that: 1) The available evidence is insufficient to determine whether crash risk is elevated for drivers with TBI compared to uninjured controls (Summary RR=1.32; 95% CI=0.77-2.25). However, driving performance was significantly impaired among individuals with TBI compared to uninjured controls (Strength of Evidence: Moderate); 2) Cognitive function measured by certain neuropsychological tests may predict the outcome of driving performance measured by a road test for patients with TBI. (Strength of Evidence: Moderate); and 3) Individuals with TBI who have not experienced a seizure within the first week post-injury still have a significant likelihood of experiencing late seizure(s). Frequencies of late seizures ranged from 1% to 25% during follow-up periods ranging from 1 to 11 years (Strength of Evidence: Moderate). The highest rate of late seizures (25%) was associated primarily with penetrating missile TBIs (Strength of Evidence: Minimally Acceptable [32% vs. 5%]). These findings have potential implications for regulatory agencies with responsibility for road safety.