Location

Bolton Landing, New York

Date

18-6-2013

Session

Session 3 – Lectures Measuring Driving Distraction

Abstract

The Detection Response Task (DRT) is currently discussed in the ISO working group TC22/SC13/WG8 as the basis of a standard to assess the effect of cognitive load on driver attention. This paper investigates the sensitivity of the method to cognitive and visual-manual tasks of different levels of difficulty and to different levels of driving demand. Three versions of DRT have been used in a simulator experiment: two visual versions (HDRT and RDRT) and one tactile version (TDRT). The results show that response times to DRT stimuli increase with the driving demand and with the difficulty of the cognitive auditory task. However, no difference is registered between visual-manual tasks of different levels of difficulty, which is explained in terms of attentional allocation and ceiling effect.

Rights

Copyright © 2013 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Seventh International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 17-20, 2013, Bolton Landing, New York. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2013: 64-70.

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Jun 18th, 12:00 AM

Sensitivity of Detection Response Task (DRT) to the Driving Demand and Task Difficulty

Bolton Landing, New York

The Detection Response Task (DRT) is currently discussed in the ISO working group TC22/SC13/WG8 as the basis of a standard to assess the effect of cognitive load on driver attention. This paper investigates the sensitivity of the method to cognitive and visual-manual tasks of different levels of difficulty and to different levels of driving demand. Three versions of DRT have been used in a simulator experiment: two visual versions (HDRT and RDRT) and one tactile version (TDRT). The results show that response times to DRT stimuli increase with the driving demand and with the difficulty of the cognitive auditory task. However, no difference is registered between visual-manual tasks of different levels of difficulty, which is explained in terms of attentional allocation and ceiling effect.