DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1499

Location

Bolton Landing, New York

Date

19-6-2013

Session

Session 6 – Lectures Driver Performance and Simulation Studies

Abstract

Previous literature suggests that haptic gas pedals can assist the driver in search of maximum fuel economy. This study investigated three haptic pedal designs, each with high and low intensities of feedback, in a rapid prototyping, paired comparison design. Twenty drivers took part, experiencing the systems in a high-fidelity driving simulator. Results suggested that drivers were best guided towards an “idealized” (most fuel efficient) gas pedal position by force feedback (where a driver feels a step change in gas pedal force) as opposed to stiffness feedback (where a driver feels a changing gas pedal firmness). In either case, high levels of force/stiffness feedback were preferred. Objective performance measures mirrored the subjective results. Whilst the short-term nature (brief system exposure) of this study led to difficulties in drawing longer-term conclusions, it would appear that force feedback haptics are better suited than stiffness feedback to augment an effective driver interface supporting “green” driving.

Rights

Copyright © 2013 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Seventh International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 17-20, 2013, Bolton Landing, New York. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2013: 264-270.

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Jun 19th, 12:00 AM

The Design of Haptic Gas Pedal Feedback to Support Eco-Driving

Bolton Landing, New York

Previous literature suggests that haptic gas pedals can assist the driver in search of maximum fuel economy. This study investigated three haptic pedal designs, each with high and low intensities of feedback, in a rapid prototyping, paired comparison design. Twenty drivers took part, experiencing the systems in a high-fidelity driving simulator. Results suggested that drivers were best guided towards an “idealized” (most fuel efficient) gas pedal position by force feedback (where a driver feels a step change in gas pedal force) as opposed to stiffness feedback (where a driver feels a changing gas pedal firmness). In either case, high levels of force/stiffness feedback were preferred. Objective performance measures mirrored the subjective results. Whilst the short-term nature (brief system exposure) of this study led to difficulties in drawing longer-term conclusions, it would appear that force feedback haptics are better suited than stiffness feedback to augment an effective driver interface supporting “green” driving.