DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1552

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to assess how changeable message signs (CMS) within the right-of-way affect driver behavior and attention. Experiment 1 evaluated whether repeated exposure to irrelevant messages would cause drivers to fail to respond to a safety critical message. Experiment 2 evaluated whether the presence of a driving irrelevant message designed to attract attention would cause drivers to fail to respond to a hazard in the roadway. In both experiments, drivers completed a lengthy (about 50 min) driving simulation in a freeway scenario with CMS every 0.8 km (0.5 mi). Dependent measures were gaze location, response to safety critical message (Exp. 1), and response to spilled load in roadway (Exp. 2). It was found that (1) when headways were short, drivers tend to focus on the roadway and not on a CMS; (2) repeated exposure to irrelevant messages did not cause drivers to miss safety critical messages; (3) salient CMS images (changing faces) did not cause failures to detect a roadway hazard, and (4) the frequency and duration of looks to salient images and travel time messages were similar.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 63-69.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Assessing the Distraction Potential of Changeable Highway Message Signs

Salt Lake City, Utah

Two experiments were conducted to assess how changeable message signs (CMS) within the right-of-way affect driver behavior and attention. Experiment 1 evaluated whether repeated exposure to irrelevant messages would cause drivers to fail to respond to a safety critical message. Experiment 2 evaluated whether the presence of a driving irrelevant message designed to attract attention would cause drivers to fail to respond to a hazard in the roadway. In both experiments, drivers completed a lengthy (about 50 min) driving simulation in a freeway scenario with CMS every 0.8 km (0.5 mi). Dependent measures were gaze location, response to safety critical message (Exp. 1), and response to spilled load in roadway (Exp. 2). It was found that (1) when headways were short, drivers tend to focus on the roadway and not on a CMS; (2) repeated exposure to irrelevant messages did not cause drivers to miss safety critical messages; (3) salient CMS images (changing faces) did not cause failures to detect a roadway hazard, and (4) the frequency and duration of looks to salient images and travel time messages were similar.