Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

In line with changed views on driver training and driver instructor preparation a competence-based instructor exam was introduced in the Netherlands. The exam consists of two parts: 1) multimedia theory tests, 2) a performance assessment. An implicit idea behind the innovated exam is that it can have a positive backwash effect on the quality of driver instructor preparation programs. This study aims to evaluate the reliability, validity and fairness of the theoretical tests, which appear in different versions across time. Data of 4741 prospective driving instructors, enrolled during the period between January 1010 and October 2012, were used for analysis. The results of IRT-analyses show that the theory tests yielded reliable and fair decisions, although misclassifications occurred across versions. The predictive validity of the theory tests for the final performance assessment was low. Implications for the design and maintenance of exam programs are discussed. Follow-up studies will focus on the question, whether the improved instructor exam contribute to safer drivers in the end.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 77-83.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

A Competence Based Exam for Prospective Driving Instructors: Construction, Validation, and Implications

Salt Lake City, Utah

In line with changed views on driver training and driver instructor preparation a competence-based instructor exam was introduced in the Netherlands. The exam consists of two parts: 1) multimedia theory tests, 2) a performance assessment. An implicit idea behind the innovated exam is that it can have a positive backwash effect on the quality of driver instructor preparation programs. This study aims to evaluate the reliability, validity and fairness of the theoretical tests, which appear in different versions across time. Data of 4741 prospective driving instructors, enrolled during the period between January 1010 and October 2012, were used for analysis. The results of IRT-analyses show that the theory tests yielded reliable and fair decisions, although misclassifications occurred across versions. The predictive validity of the theory tests for the final performance assessment was low. Implications for the design and maintenance of exam programs are discussed. Follow-up studies will focus on the question, whether the improved instructor exam contribute to safer drivers in the end.