Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

Youth with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) depend to a great extent on friends and family for their transportation needs. Although little research exists, Cox et al. (2012) surveyed parents/caregivers of youth with ASD (previously) attempting to learn to drive. This study serves as an extension by surveying driver instructors. Several questions queried advice for teaching youth with ASD how to drive, and for improving the current driving education to better fit the needs of youth with ASD. Furthermore, respondents were asked to indicate whether specific characteristics, often associated with ASD, have an impact on driving ability. A total of 52 driver instructors reported potential problems when teaching youth with ASD to drive. Advice for teaching youth with ASD to drive mainly focused on a need for structure, clarity, visual demonstration, practice, repetition and an individualized approach. Results however also showed that the relation between ASD and driving performance might not always be negative but can be positive. Practical implications are provided.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 98-104.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Exploring the Driving Behavior of Youth with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Driver Instructor Questionnaire

Salt Lake City, Utah

Youth with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) depend to a great extent on friends and family for their transportation needs. Although little research exists, Cox et al. (2012) surveyed parents/caregivers of youth with ASD (previously) attempting to learn to drive. This study serves as an extension by surveying driver instructors. Several questions queried advice for teaching youth with ASD how to drive, and for improving the current driving education to better fit the needs of youth with ASD. Furthermore, respondents were asked to indicate whether specific characteristics, often associated with ASD, have an impact on driving ability. A total of 52 driver instructors reported potential problems when teaching youth with ASD to drive. Advice for teaching youth with ASD to drive mainly focused on a need for structure, clarity, visual demonstration, practice, repetition and an individualized approach. Results however also showed that the relation between ASD and driving performance might not always be negative but can be positive. Practical implications are provided.