Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

Drivers read other drivers’ intentions using various non-verbal communication cues in situations where traffic regulations play only a limited role. Although such communication is important to reach safe joint actions with other driver(s), effects of communication have not been fully understood. The objective of this study was to understand effects of communication cues on driver’s decisions and confidence. Straight-cross-path and left-turn scenarios around an uncontrolled intersection were studied in an interview-based experiment using 65 subjects. The subject’s car approached the intersection while another car was approaching the same intersection and sent communication cues consisting of various combinations of vehicle behaviors (constant speed, speeding up, and slowing down) and hand gestures (meaning “Go ahead” and “Stop”). Computer animations of the scenarios were presented to the subjects and terminated before the two cars reached the intersection. The subjects rated yielding frequency and confidence level for each cue combination in each scenario. The results showed that the vehicle behaviors and the hand gestures affected subjects’ yielding frequencies and confidence levels. The cues also interacted with the priority rule in the left turn scenarios. The hand gestures were especially effective to consolidate subjects’ decisions to yield or go with confidence when the priority rule was ineffective (i.e. in the straight-cross-path scenarios). The hand gestures were also effective to change the yielding frequencies to accept the cues conflicting with the effective priority rule (i.e. in the left-turn scenarios). Some requirements and recommendations for autonomous vehicle were discussed.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 113-119.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Effects of Non-Verbal Communication Cues on Decisions and Confidence of Drivers at an Uncontrolled Intersection

Salt Lake City, Utah

Drivers read other drivers’ intentions using various non-verbal communication cues in situations where traffic regulations play only a limited role. Although such communication is important to reach safe joint actions with other driver(s), effects of communication have not been fully understood. The objective of this study was to understand effects of communication cues on driver’s decisions and confidence. Straight-cross-path and left-turn scenarios around an uncontrolled intersection were studied in an interview-based experiment using 65 subjects. The subject’s car approached the intersection while another car was approaching the same intersection and sent communication cues consisting of various combinations of vehicle behaviors (constant speed, speeding up, and slowing down) and hand gestures (meaning “Go ahead” and “Stop”). Computer animations of the scenarios were presented to the subjects and terminated before the two cars reached the intersection. The subjects rated yielding frequency and confidence level for each cue combination in each scenario. The results showed that the vehicle behaviors and the hand gestures affected subjects’ yielding frequencies and confidence levels. The cues also interacted with the priority rule in the left turn scenarios. The hand gestures were especially effective to consolidate subjects’ decisions to yield or go with confidence when the priority rule was ineffective (i.e. in the straight-cross-path scenarios). The hand gestures were also effective to change the yielding frequencies to accept the cues conflicting with the effective priority rule (i.e. in the left-turn scenarios). Some requirements and recommendations for autonomous vehicle were discussed.