DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1560

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

We compared the eye movements of novice drivers and experienced drivers while they drove a simulated driving scenario that included a number of intersections interspersed with stretches of straight road. The intersections included non-hazard events. Cassavaugh, Bos, McDonald, Gunaratne, & Backs (2013) attempted to model attention allocation of experienced drivers using the SEEV model. Here we compared two SEEV model fits between those experienced drivers and a sample of novice drivers. The first was a simplified model and the second was a more complex intersection model. The observed eye movement data was found to be a good fit to the simplified model for both experienced (R2 = 0.88) and novice drivers (R2 = 0.30). Like the previous results of the intersection model for the experienced drivers, the fit of the observed eye movement data to the intersection model for novice drivers was poor, and was no better than fitting the data to a randomized SEEV model. We concluded based on the simplified SEEV model, fixation count and fixation variance that experienced drivers were found to be more efficient at distributing their visual search compared to novice drivers.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 120-126.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Comparison of Novice and Experienced Drivers Using the SEEV Model to Predict Attention Allocation at Intersections During Simulated Driving

Salt Lake City, Utah

We compared the eye movements of novice drivers and experienced drivers while they drove a simulated driving scenario that included a number of intersections interspersed with stretches of straight road. The intersections included non-hazard events. Cassavaugh, Bos, McDonald, Gunaratne, & Backs (2013) attempted to model attention allocation of experienced drivers using the SEEV model. Here we compared two SEEV model fits between those experienced drivers and a sample of novice drivers. The first was a simplified model and the second was a more complex intersection model. The observed eye movement data was found to be a good fit to the simplified model for both experienced (R2 = 0.88) and novice drivers (R2 = 0.30). Like the previous results of the intersection model for the experienced drivers, the fit of the observed eye movement data to the intersection model for novice drivers was poor, and was no better than fitting the data to a randomized SEEV model. We concluded based on the simplified SEEV model, fixation count and fixation variance that experienced drivers were found to be more efficient at distributing their visual search compared to novice drivers.