DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1563

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 3 – Poster Session A

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the eye glance patterns of Detection Response Tasks (DRTs) for assessment of driver distraction during simulated driving. Several types of DRTs across visual, tactile and haptic modalities were used to investigate driver distraction by the ISO Driving Distraction working group. As part of the working group, we conducted a simulated driving study examining driver performance while engaging the primary driving task with visual-manual or auditory-verbal secondary tasks. Results of eye glance analysis showed that the visual DRTs increased visual load in driving more than the tactile DRT. Subsequently, the visual DRTs marginally increased the total glance time for forward view by 6.27 seconds and significantly increased the detection response time by 135.79 ms than the tactile DRT. As for the secondary tasks, the visual-manual secondary task yielded significantly longer total eye-offthe-road time (effect size = 50.75 ms), as well as DRT response times than the auditory-verbal ones time (effect size = 55.85 ms). This study allowed us to examine the relationships between rated situational awareness, DRT performance, and glance patterns, yielding insights into the relationship between objective task performance measures and subjective ratings.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 141-147.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Eye Glance Analysis of the Surrogate Tests for Driver Distraction

Salt Lake City, Utah

The purpose of this study was to examine the eye glance patterns of Detection Response Tasks (DRTs) for assessment of driver distraction during simulated driving. Several types of DRTs across visual, tactile and haptic modalities were used to investigate driver distraction by the ISO Driving Distraction working group. As part of the working group, we conducted a simulated driving study examining driver performance while engaging the primary driving task with visual-manual or auditory-verbal secondary tasks. Results of eye glance analysis showed that the visual DRTs increased visual load in driving more than the tactile DRT. Subsequently, the visual DRTs marginally increased the total glance time for forward view by 6.27 seconds and significantly increased the detection response time by 135.79 ms than the tactile DRT. As for the secondary tasks, the visual-manual secondary task yielded significantly longer total eye-offthe-road time (effect size = 50.75 ms), as well as DRT response times than the auditory-verbal ones time (effect size = 55.85 ms). This study allowed us to examine the relationships between rated situational awareness, DRT performance, and glance patterns, yielding insights into the relationship between objective task performance measures and subjective ratings.