Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

24-6-2015

Session

Session 4 – Lectures Younger & Older Drivers

Abstract

Young drivers need continued training and educational efforts beyond licensure. The latest in-vehicle monitoring technologies provide a promising way to monitor and advise driving behaviors in real-time. Literature to-date suggests limited success for changing driving behaviors via the use of in-vehicle monitoring technologies, and teens and parents have mixed perceptions about such devices. We argue that certain reinforcement techniques and parameters may lead to more sustainable behavioral changes. This paper describes the findings of an interview with young drivers on their perspectives of in-vehicle monitoring technologies and a feasibility driving simulator experiment that incorporated key reinforcement techniques. Eighteen young drivers participated in individual semi-structured interviews and 17 participated in the simulator experiment. Participants saw values in having a smartphone application-based system that can monitor their driving and provide positive recognition for safe behaviors and negative alerts for unsafe behaviors. Preliminary behavioral data from the simulator experiment showed mixed results. The findings show promise for incorporating reinforcement techniques in continued education beyond licensure but further research is needed to understand the timing for using such techniques.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 169-175.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

Techniques for Reducing Speeding Beyond Licensure: Young Drivers' Preferences

Salt Lake City, Utah

Young drivers need continued training and educational efforts beyond licensure. The latest in-vehicle monitoring technologies provide a promising way to monitor and advise driving behaviors in real-time. Literature to-date suggests limited success for changing driving behaviors via the use of in-vehicle monitoring technologies, and teens and parents have mixed perceptions about such devices. We argue that certain reinforcement techniques and parameters may lead to more sustainable behavioral changes. This paper describes the findings of an interview with young drivers on their perspectives of in-vehicle monitoring technologies and a feasibility driving simulator experiment that incorporated key reinforcement techniques. Eighteen young drivers participated in individual semi-structured interviews and 17 participated in the simulator experiment. Participants saw values in having a smartphone application-based system that can monitor their driving and provide positive recognition for safe behaviors and negative alerts for unsafe behaviors. Preliminary behavioral data from the simulator experiment showed mixed results. The findings show promise for incorporating reinforcement techniques in continued education beyond licensure but further research is needed to understand the timing for using such techniques.