DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1569

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

24-6-2015

Session

Session 5 – Lectures Research Methods & Perspectives

Abstract

The majority of traffic fatalities involving pedestrians occur at night and this is largely attributed to low illumination conditions. Yet, drivers tend to underuse their high beams despite the visibility benefits afforded to them. In the present study we report high beam usage rates during an open-road drive using a video camera-based method. Measurements of low and high beam headlamp illuminance were also taken for all vehicles used in this study. The results indicate that drivers, on average, used their high beams 48% of the time possible. Furthermore, there was a moderately negative relationship between low beam output and high beam use indicating that drivers whose low beams produced less illumination tended to use their high beams more often. Future research should empirically investigate this relationship to lend further insight into the mechanism by which beam output influences beam usage. Research that improves our understanding of drivers’ knowledge and use of high beams is likely to be important as headlighting technologies continue to advance.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 183-189.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

Using a Video Camera-Based Method to Gather Real World High Beam Usage Data

Salt Lake City, Utah

The majority of traffic fatalities involving pedestrians occur at night and this is largely attributed to low illumination conditions. Yet, drivers tend to underuse their high beams despite the visibility benefits afforded to them. In the present study we report high beam usage rates during an open-road drive using a video camera-based method. Measurements of low and high beam headlamp illuminance were also taken for all vehicles used in this study. The results indicate that drivers, on average, used their high beams 48% of the time possible. Furthermore, there was a moderately negative relationship between low beam output and high beam use indicating that drivers whose low beams produced less illumination tended to use their high beams more often. Future research should empirically investigate this relationship to lend further insight into the mechanism by which beam output influences beam usage. Research that improves our understanding of drivers’ knowledge and use of high beams is likely to be important as headlighting technologies continue to advance.