Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

24-6-2015

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

In a prior study, intersection detection failures of individuals with hemianopia were strongly associated with inadequate head scanning; however, eye position was not tracked. In this pilot study, we tracked eye and head movements, and examined the relationship between gaze scanning and detection of pedestrians at intersections in a driving simulator. Gaze scan deficits, in particular not scanning sufficiently far into the blind hemifield, were the main reason for detection failures at the extreme edge of the clear-sight triangle in the blind hemifield. In addition, the gaze data revealed detection failures due to looked-but-failed-to-see events. The results suggest that HH drivers may be at increased risk for collisions at intersections.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 240-246.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

Pilot Study of Gaze Scanning and Intersection Detection Failures by Drivers with Hemianopia

Salt Lake City, Utah

In a prior study, intersection detection failures of individuals with hemianopia were strongly associated with inadequate head scanning; however, eye position was not tracked. In this pilot study, we tracked eye and head movements, and examined the relationship between gaze scanning and detection of pedestrians at intersections in a driving simulator. Gaze scan deficits, in particular not scanning sufficiently far into the blind hemifield, were the main reason for detection failures at the extreme edge of the clear-sight triangle in the blind hemifield. In addition, the gaze data revealed detection failures due to looked-but-failed-to-see events. The results suggest that HH drivers may be at increased risk for collisions at intersections.