DOI

10.17077/drivingassessment.1579

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

24-6-2015

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

Despite the potential for improving hazard perception skills, novice driver training interventions run the risk of student overestimations in driving skills and increased risk-taking, e.g., speeding—particularly for young male drivers. Provided is the simulator performance and survey (driver self-confidence and speeding risk attitude) data of simulator trained and no-trained students from a high school driver education intervention, N = 316. Multivariate analysis of simulator performance measures and survey results at pre/post-test showed that simulator trained drivers had better hazard perception and higher driver self-confidence than no-trained drivers at semester end. While no strong sex differences were found for driving performance, males showed higher self-confidence and speed risk attitudes. Females lowered their speed risk attitudes regardless of training group. However, only simulator trained males lowered their speeding attitude while no-trained males showed no change. Driving simulation training that provides repeated collision events may help novice male drivers in particular by mediating the effects of over self-confidence from driving skill acquisition programs.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 247-253.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

Novice Driver Simulation Training Potential for Improving Hazard Perception and Self-Confidence While Lowering Speeding Risk Attitudes for Young Males

Salt Lake City, Utah

Despite the potential for improving hazard perception skills, novice driver training interventions run the risk of student overestimations in driving skills and increased risk-taking, e.g., speeding—particularly for young male drivers. Provided is the simulator performance and survey (driver self-confidence and speeding risk attitude) data of simulator trained and no-trained students from a high school driver education intervention, N = 316. Multivariate analysis of simulator performance measures and survey results at pre/post-test showed that simulator trained drivers had better hazard perception and higher driver self-confidence than no-trained drivers at semester end. While no strong sex differences were found for driving performance, males showed higher self-confidence and speed risk attitudes. Females lowered their speed risk attitudes regardless of training group. However, only simulator trained males lowered their speeding attitude while no-trained males showed no change. Driving simulation training that provides repeated collision events may help novice male drivers in particular by mediating the effects of over self-confidence from driving skill acquisition programs.