Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

24-6-2015

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

There are an estimated 5.7 million Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) drivers in the United States in 2012. Health and Safety of CMV drivers are of high consequence group because of: occupational risks from the size and speed of their vehicles, frequently poor health status, poor health care utilization, and the large impact of truck crashes on public health and safety. CMV drivers pass a commercial driver medical examination (CDME) to maintain licensure. CDME examiners document multiple potentially disqualifying health conditions. CMV drivers reportedly have poor health status, which may be attributed to lifestyle and occupational factors (e.g., improper diet, inadequate physical activity, poor sleep hygiene, shift work), yet few data are reported analyzing relative importance and relationships of these factors. Methods- CDMEs conducted between 2005 and 2012 among 88,246 commercial drivers were analyzed. Associations between measured Body Mass Index (BMI) categories and CDME findings, as well as driver certification were examined. Results- 53.3% of drivers were obese (BMI>30.0 kg/m2 ) with half of those being morbidly obese (BMI>35.0 kg/m2 ). After adjustment for age and gender, obese drivers were statistically significantly less likely to be certified for the full 2 year period and significantly more likely to report many factors including heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, nervous disorders, sleep disorders, and chronic low back pain (all p<0.0001). ConclusionsBMI is related to many factors, some of which have been associated with increased crash risk. BMI screening may be a useful tool. Interventions for BMI reduction may have an impact on comorbidities.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 261-267.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

Commercial Driver Medical Exams: Relationships Between Body Mass Index and Comorbid Conditions

Salt Lake City, Utah

There are an estimated 5.7 million Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) drivers in the United States in 2012. Health and Safety of CMV drivers are of high consequence group because of: occupational risks from the size and speed of their vehicles, frequently poor health status, poor health care utilization, and the large impact of truck crashes on public health and safety. CMV drivers pass a commercial driver medical examination (CDME) to maintain licensure. CDME examiners document multiple potentially disqualifying health conditions. CMV drivers reportedly have poor health status, which may be attributed to lifestyle and occupational factors (e.g., improper diet, inadequate physical activity, poor sleep hygiene, shift work), yet few data are reported analyzing relative importance and relationships of these factors. Methods- CDMEs conducted between 2005 and 2012 among 88,246 commercial drivers were analyzed. Associations between measured Body Mass Index (BMI) categories and CDME findings, as well as driver certification were examined. Results- 53.3% of drivers were obese (BMI>30.0 kg/m2 ) with half of those being morbidly obese (BMI>35.0 kg/m2 ). After adjustment for age and gender, obese drivers were statistically significantly less likely to be certified for the full 2 year period and significantly more likely to report many factors including heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, nervous disorders, sleep disorders, and chronic low back pain (all p<0.0001). ConclusionsBMI is related to many factors, some of which have been associated with increased crash risk. BMI screening may be a useful tool. Interventions for BMI reduction may have an impact on comorbidities.