Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

24-6-2015

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

Using a phone while driving leads to distraction and impaired driving performance. When reading text on a phone, the act of looking away from the road could cause driving impairment. Wearable displays like Google Glass might reduce the visual impairment caused by looking away, even if they do not overcome other factors contributing to impaired driving. However, such devices could also increase impairment by giving drivers the mistaken impression that they can pay attention to both the display and the road simultaneously or impair visual processing by superimposing visual information in the driving scenes. We compared driving performance in a simulated naturalistic driving task while drivers read text on Google Glass or on a smartphone. As expected, reading on Google Glass and the smartphone both impaired driving performance by increasing lane variations, but drivers using Google Glass showed less lane variation compared to smartphone users. To the extent that these metrics reflect better driving performance, Google Glass might somewhat reduce the costs of reading text while driving. Keywords: Driver distraction; Tactical vehicle control; Google Glass; Cellphone

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 275-281.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

Driving While Reading Using Google Glass Versus Using a Smartphone: Which is More Distracting to Driving Performance?

Salt Lake City, Utah

Using a phone while driving leads to distraction and impaired driving performance. When reading text on a phone, the act of looking away from the road could cause driving impairment. Wearable displays like Google Glass might reduce the visual impairment caused by looking away, even if they do not overcome other factors contributing to impaired driving. However, such devices could also increase impairment by giving drivers the mistaken impression that they can pay attention to both the display and the road simultaneously or impair visual processing by superimposing visual information in the driving scenes. We compared driving performance in a simulated naturalistic driving task while drivers read text on Google Glass or on a smartphone. As expected, reading on Google Glass and the smartphone both impaired driving performance by increasing lane variations, but drivers using Google Glass showed less lane variation compared to smartphone users. To the extent that these metrics reflect better driving performance, Google Glass might somewhat reduce the costs of reading text while driving. Keywords: Driver distraction; Tactical vehicle control; Google Glass; Cellphone