Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

24-6-2015

Session

Session 7 – Poster Session B

Abstract

This research paper explores the role that familiarity with crash warning systems has on the evaluation of those systems. Prior research has not been consistent in it treatment of providing system training and exposure to participants. The potential impact of these differences in methodology on key measures of response and outcome is unknown. Ninety-six participants completed this study that crossed system training with prior exposure to the warning to systematically evaluate these effects for both forward crash warning (FCW) and lane departure warning (LDW) systems evaluations. Prior exposure to the alerts led to changes in engagement with the distraction task for both FCW and LDW events. Training on the system influenced outcomes of the FCW events with less severe outcomes for participants who were aware they had the system. There is also evidence that driver who were aware of the system’s presence but did not have prior exposure to it were less likely to complete the experiment successfully. The results of this study point to an advantage in not provide prior system awareness training in terms of longer commitment times to allow the crash warning events to materialize when prior exposure to the alerts is provided.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 289-295.

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Jun 24th, 12:00 AM

The Role of System Training and Exposure on Crash Warning Evaluation

Salt Lake City, Utah

This research paper explores the role that familiarity with crash warning systems has on the evaluation of those systems. Prior research has not been consistent in it treatment of providing system training and exposure to participants. The potential impact of these differences in methodology on key measures of response and outcome is unknown. Ninety-six participants completed this study that crossed system training with prior exposure to the warning to systematically evaluate these effects for both forward crash warning (FCW) and lane departure warning (LDW) systems evaluations. Prior exposure to the alerts led to changes in engagement with the distraction task for both FCW and LDW events. Training on the system influenced outcomes of the FCW events with less severe outcomes for participants who were aware they had the system. There is also evidence that driver who were aware of the system’s presence but did not have prior exposure to it were less likely to complete the experiment successfully. The results of this study point to an advantage in not provide prior system awareness training in terms of longer commitment times to allow the crash warning events to materialize when prior exposure to the alerts is provided.