Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

25-6-2015

Session

Session 8 – Hybrid Presentations

Abstract

Research has revealed that when drivers are presented with an informative tactile collision warning, they are able to produce faster braking reaction times (BRTs) which may potentially reduce the likelihood and severity of rear-end collisions. To expand on this research, we investigated the effectiveness of unimodal (tactile) and multisensory (audiotactile) informative collision warnings for younger and older drivers. In line with our previous results, driver BRTs were significantly faster when they were presented with an informative signal as compared to a non-informative signal and a control condition in which no warnings were presented. The results also revealed that the unimodal informative warning was just as effective as the multisensory warning. Intriguingly, older drivers exhibited faster BRTs than younger drivers, and were significantly faster following the presentation of multisensory warning signals. Finally, this study identifies the need to compare new configurations of informative tactile collision warning signals.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 324-330.

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Informative Collision Warnings: Effect of Modality and Driver Age

Salt Lake City, Utah

Research has revealed that when drivers are presented with an informative tactile collision warning, they are able to produce faster braking reaction times (BRTs) which may potentially reduce the likelihood and severity of rear-end collisions. To expand on this research, we investigated the effectiveness of unimodal (tactile) and multisensory (audiotactile) informative collision warnings for younger and older drivers. In line with our previous results, driver BRTs were significantly faster when they were presented with an informative signal as compared to a non-informative signal and a control condition in which no warnings were presented. The results also revealed that the unimodal informative warning was just as effective as the multisensory warning. Intriguingly, older drivers exhibited faster BRTs than younger drivers, and were significantly faster following the presentation of multisensory warning signals. Finally, this study identifies the need to compare new configurations of informative tactile collision warning signals.