Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 1 – Lectures Driver Behavior and Naturalistic Studies

Abstract

This study assessed the impact of cognitive distraction on drivers’ anticipatory glances. Participants drove an instrumented vehicle and executed a number of secondary tasks associated with increasing levels of mental workload including: listening to the radio or audiobook, talking on a handheld or hands-free cellphone, interacting with a voice-based e-mail/text system, and executing a highly demanding task (Operational Span task; OSPAN). Drivers’ visual scanning behavior was recorded by four different high definition cameras and coded offline frame-by-frame. Visual scanning behavior at road intersections with crosswalks was targeted because distraction is one of the major causes of accidents at these locations (NHTSA, 2010a). Despite the familiarity of the locations, results showed that as the secondary-task became more cognitively demanding drivers reduced the amount of anticipatory glances to potential hazards locations. For example, while interacting with a high fidelity voice-based email/text system, the probability of executing a complete scan of the intersection was reduced by 11% compared to the no-distraction control condition. These results document the effects of cognitive distraction on drivers’ visual scanning for potential hazards and highlight the detrimental role of voice based systems on driving behavior.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 23-29.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Cognitive Distraction Impairs Drivers' Anticipatory Glances: An On-Road Study

Salt Lake City, Utah

This study assessed the impact of cognitive distraction on drivers’ anticipatory glances. Participants drove an instrumented vehicle and executed a number of secondary tasks associated with increasing levels of mental workload including: listening to the radio or audiobook, talking on a handheld or hands-free cellphone, interacting with a voice-based e-mail/text system, and executing a highly demanding task (Operational Span task; OSPAN). Drivers’ visual scanning behavior was recorded by four different high definition cameras and coded offline frame-by-frame. Visual scanning behavior at road intersections with crosswalks was targeted because distraction is one of the major causes of accidents at these locations (NHTSA, 2010a). Despite the familiarity of the locations, results showed that as the secondary-task became more cognitively demanding drivers reduced the amount of anticipatory glances to potential hazards locations. For example, while interacting with a high fidelity voice-based email/text system, the probability of executing a complete scan of the intersection was reduced by 11% compared to the no-distraction control condition. These results document the effects of cognitive distraction on drivers’ visual scanning for potential hazards and highlight the detrimental role of voice based systems on driving behavior.