Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

25-6-2015

Session

Session 8 – Hybrid Presentations

Abstract

Appropriate automation trust is a prerequisite for safe, comfortable andefficient use of highly automated driving systems (HADS). Earlier researchindicates that a drivers’ nationality and Take-Over Requests (TOR) due toimperfect system reliability might affect trust, but this has never been investigatedin the context of highly automated driving. A driving simulator study (N = 80)showed that TORs only temporarily lowered trust in HADSs, and revealedsimilarities in trust formation between German and Chinese drivers. Trust wassignificantly higher after experiencing the system than before, both for German andChinese participants. However, Chinese drivers reported significantly higherautomation mistrust than German drivers. Self-report measures of automation trustwere not connected to behavioral measures. The results support a distinctionbetween automation trust and mistrust as separate constructs, short- and long-termeffects of TORs on automation trust, and cultural differences in automation trust.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 331-337.

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Effects of Take-Over Requests and Cultural Background on Automation Trust in Highly Automated Driving

Salt Lake City, Utah

Appropriate automation trust is a prerequisite for safe, comfortable andefficient use of highly automated driving systems (HADS). Earlier researchindicates that a drivers’ nationality and Take-Over Requests (TOR) due toimperfect system reliability might affect trust, but this has never been investigatedin the context of highly automated driving. A driving simulator study (N = 80)showed that TORs only temporarily lowered trust in HADSs, and revealedsimilarities in trust formation between German and Chinese drivers. Trust wassignificantly higher after experiencing the system than before, both for German andChinese participants. However, Chinese drivers reported significantly higherautomation mistrust than German drivers. Self-report measures of automation trustwere not connected to behavioral measures. The results support a distinctionbetween automation trust and mistrust as separate constructs, short- and long-termeffects of TORs on automation trust, and cultural differences in automation trust.