Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

25-6-2015

Session

Session 8 – Hybrid Presentations

Abstract

Underdeveloped hazard perception skills are associated with the higher crash risk of young novice drivers. Some driver licensing authorities use hazard perception tests (HPTs) that measure reaction times or multiple-choice responses to brief driving scenes videotaped from a vehicle traveling at legal speeds. To date, evaluations of the association between HPT scores and novice driver crash rates have been mixed. Several possible explanations for this are: high-risk novice drivers may offset good HP skills by exceeding the speed limit; current HPTs do not capture behavioral responses to hazards from candidates whose attention is engaged in the driving task; there is no established typology of driving hazards that might produce a finer-grained analysis of test results, and; current measures of HP ability may lack sensitivity. To address these potential flaws, we developed a driving simulatorbased Hazard Response Test (HRT) in which drivers respond to sixteen programmed hazard events derived from a proposed typology that combines visible or hidden, real or potential conflicts, while driving over three continuous routes. The study results indicate no statistically significant difference in crash rates between young novice and experienced drivers. However, a novel, composite measure called the Continuous Time to Collision (C-TTC) did discriminate between young novice and older experienced drivers. Additional research on the validation of this measure and further refinement of the hazard typology could contribute to the creation of a standardized, driving simulator-based HRT for use in the evaluation of novice, professional and aging drivers.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 338-344.

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Towards the Validation of a Driving Simulator-Based Hazard Response Test for Novice Drivers

Salt Lake City, Utah

Underdeveloped hazard perception skills are associated with the higher crash risk of young novice drivers. Some driver licensing authorities use hazard perception tests (HPTs) that measure reaction times or multiple-choice responses to brief driving scenes videotaped from a vehicle traveling at legal speeds. To date, evaluations of the association between HPT scores and novice driver crash rates have been mixed. Several possible explanations for this are: high-risk novice drivers may offset good HP skills by exceeding the speed limit; current HPTs do not capture behavioral responses to hazards from candidates whose attention is engaged in the driving task; there is no established typology of driving hazards that might produce a finer-grained analysis of test results, and; current measures of HP ability may lack sensitivity. To address these potential flaws, we developed a driving simulatorbased Hazard Response Test (HRT) in which drivers respond to sixteen programmed hazard events derived from a proposed typology that combines visible or hidden, real or potential conflicts, while driving over three continuous routes. The study results indicate no statistically significant difference in crash rates between young novice and experienced drivers. However, a novel, composite measure called the Continuous Time to Collision (C-TTC) did discriminate between young novice and older experienced drivers. Additional research on the validation of this measure and further refinement of the hazard typology could contribute to the creation of a standardized, driving simulator-based HRT for use in the evaluation of novice, professional and aging drivers.