Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

25-6-2015

Session

Session 9 – Lectures Driver Interface Issues

Abstract

Real-time, in-vehicle guidance on eco-driving is likely to produce substantial improvements in vehicle fuel economy. However, the benefits of such in-vehicle systems should be achieved without impairing driver safety. A simulator study evaluated both visual and haptic eco-driving feedback systems, which provided advice on gas pedal usage. Hill driving scenarios with variable traffic density were used to test drivers’ prioritization of safe and fuel-efficient driving. A visual, second-order display and a haptic force feedback gas pedal created the smallest errors in gas pedal usage and so maximized fuel efficiency. The visual display increased time spent looking away from the road, implying reduced driver safety. Participants were worse at eco-driving in more demanding, high traffic conditions. Drivers appeared to prioritize safety over eco-driving, however safety margins were shorter in the high density traffic condition, despite the degradation in eco-driving performance. The findings suggest which modality could be most appropriate for presenting in-vehicle eco-driving guidance, and hint that these systems should advise drivers based on the prevailing traffic conditions.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 415-421.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

The Effects of an Eco-Driving Interface on Driver Safety and Fuel Efficiency

Salt Lake City, Utah

Real-time, in-vehicle guidance on eco-driving is likely to produce substantial improvements in vehicle fuel economy. However, the benefits of such in-vehicle systems should be achieved without impairing driver safety. A simulator study evaluated both visual and haptic eco-driving feedback systems, which provided advice on gas pedal usage. Hill driving scenarios with variable traffic density were used to test drivers’ prioritization of safe and fuel-efficient driving. A visual, second-order display and a haptic force feedback gas pedal created the smallest errors in gas pedal usage and so maximized fuel efficiency. The visual display increased time spent looking away from the road, implying reduced driver safety. Participants were worse at eco-driving in more demanding, high traffic conditions. Drivers appeared to prioritize safety over eco-driving, however safety margins were shorter in the high density traffic condition, despite the degradation in eco-driving performance. The findings suggest which modality could be most appropriate for presenting in-vehicle eco-driving guidance, and hint that these systems should advise drivers based on the prevailing traffic conditions.