Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 2 – Lectures Medical Issues in Driving

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that comorbidities have an impact on driving performance in older adults. No study has established the relationships between comorbidities and driving in persons with Parkinson disease (PD). The aims of this study were (1) to report the types of comorbidity in a group of 111 drivers with PD and (2) to identify whether the comorbidity associated with PD is a predictor of overall fitness-to-drive decisions, crashes, and validity duration of driving license. Results showed that 72 participants (64.9%) had only Parkinson disease, and 39 (35.1%) participants had one or more medical conditions in addition to PD. The most frequent comorbidities were visual disorders (26.4%), heart and blood disorders (16.2%), neurological disorders other than PD (11.8%), and locomotor disorders (11.8%). Contrarily to what we expected, we did not find any significant associations between comorbidities and overall fitness-to-drive decisions, car crashes, or validity duration of driving license. We conclude that in this sample of drivers with PD, comorbidity was not a significant predictor of overall fitness-to-drive decisions.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 43-49.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Comorbidities in Drivers with Parkinson Disease

Salt Lake City, Utah

Previous studies have shown that comorbidities have an impact on driving performance in older adults. No study has established the relationships between comorbidities and driving in persons with Parkinson disease (PD). The aims of this study were (1) to report the types of comorbidity in a group of 111 drivers with PD and (2) to identify whether the comorbidity associated with PD is a predictor of overall fitness-to-drive decisions, crashes, and validity duration of driving license. Results showed that 72 participants (64.9%) had only Parkinson disease, and 39 (35.1%) participants had one or more medical conditions in addition to PD. The most frequent comorbidities were visual disorders (26.4%), heart and blood disorders (16.2%), neurological disorders other than PD (11.8%), and locomotor disorders (11.8%). Contrarily to what we expected, we did not find any significant associations between comorbidities and overall fitness-to-drive decisions, car crashes, or validity duration of driving license. We conclude that in this sample of drivers with PD, comorbidity was not a significant predictor of overall fitness-to-drive decisions.