Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Date

23-6-2015

Session

Session 2 – Lectures Medical Issues in Driving

Abstract

Adolescents are more likely to be involved in motor vehicle crashes in the presence of peer passengers, and risky driving behaviors of male teenagers increase in the presence of male peer passengers. There could be several mechanisms of the influence of peer passengers, however it is evident that the male teenage driver with a male peer passenger makes riskier decisions than when alone. The developing teenage brain’s activity is different from that of adults during decision-making, especially in regions associated with impulse control, response inhibition, and risk taking. This study tested the feasibility of using functional nearinfrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), a non-invasive brain imaging method that allows in vivo measurements of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in cortical tissue, to study drivers’ brain activation during simulated driving. Cortical activity was measured in participants driving alone and in the presence of a passenger. When at a dilemma zone at a signalized intersection participants showed increased activation in regions of the left and right medial pre-frontal cortex when driving with a passenger as compared to when driving alone.

Rights

Copyright © 2015 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Eighth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 22-25, 2015, Salt Lake City, Utah. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2015: 50-56.

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Jun 23rd, 12:00 AM

Pre-Frontal Cortex Activity of Male Drivers in the Presence of Passengers During Simulated Driving: An Exploratory Functional Near- Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) Study

Salt Lake City, Utah

Adolescents are more likely to be involved in motor vehicle crashes in the presence of peer passengers, and risky driving behaviors of male teenagers increase in the presence of male peer passengers. There could be several mechanisms of the influence of peer passengers, however it is evident that the male teenage driver with a male peer passenger makes riskier decisions than when alone. The developing teenage brain’s activity is different from that of adults during decision-making, especially in regions associated with impulse control, response inhibition, and risk taking. This study tested the feasibility of using functional nearinfrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), a non-invasive brain imaging method that allows in vivo measurements of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin in cortical tissue, to study drivers’ brain activation during simulated driving. Cortical activity was measured in participants driving alone and in the presence of a passenger. When at a dilemma zone at a signalized intersection participants showed increased activation in regions of the left and right medial pre-frontal cortex when driving with a passenger as compared to when driving alone.