Presenter Information

Laura Higgins
Raul Avelar
Susan Chrysler

Location

Manchester Village, Vermont

Date

27-6-2017

Session

Session 2 — Poster Session A

Abstract

Effects of different types of cell phone use were examined through an analysis of selected data from the SHRP2 Naturalistic Driving Study (NDS). Driving events involving lead-vehicle or approaching-vehicle incidents were analyzed to compare driver reaction times and crash probability across driver distraction type, driver age, and roadway environment. The analysis found that the median reaction time was 40.5% higher among drivers engaged in a visualmanual task such as texting, and crash risk for those drivers was 4.66 times higher compared to drivers who were undistracted. Median reaction times in urban environments were longer than those in freeway environments. Drivers aged 16- 19 exhibited faster reaction times then older drivers, but higher crash risk.

Rights

Copyright © 2017 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Ninth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 26-29, 2017, Manchester Village, Vermont. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2017: 94-100.

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Jun 27th, 12:00 AM

Effects of Distraction Type, Driver Age, and Roadway Environment on Reaction Times – An Analysis Using SHRP-2 NDS Data

Manchester Village, Vermont

Effects of different types of cell phone use were examined through an analysis of selected data from the SHRP2 Naturalistic Driving Study (NDS). Driving events involving lead-vehicle or approaching-vehicle incidents were analyzed to compare driver reaction times and crash probability across driver distraction type, driver age, and roadway environment. The analysis found that the median reaction time was 40.5% higher among drivers engaged in a visualmanual task such as texting, and crash risk for those drivers was 4.66 times higher compared to drivers who were undistracted. Median reaction times in urban environments were longer than those in freeway environments. Drivers aged 16- 19 exhibited faster reaction times then older drivers, but higher crash risk.