Location

Manchester Village, Vermont

Date

28-6-2017

Session

Session 4 — Lectures Driver Interface Issues

Abstract

This paper presents initial findings from a driving simulator studyThis paper presents initial findings from a driving simulator studycomparing user responses to a noise-robust voice-controlled system while drivingto a noise-sensitive one in the presence of background noise. Twenty participantsinteracted with both noise-sensitive and noise-robust simulated voice-controlledinfotainment systems while driving under three background noise conditions (nonoise, music, and children). While both systems were viewed as useful andsatisfying, user acceptance was affected by background noise with the noisesensitivesystem, but not the noise-robust one. There was also no evidence that useracceptance was calibrated by having background noise as a context for varyinglevels of accuracy. No significant differences were observed between the twosystems in driving performance metrics analyzed (average speed, speed variability,and standard deviation of lane position), but the use of either system affecteddriving performance compared to baseline driving. A larger sample size at the endof this study along with the analysis of a larger set of performance metrics willprovide further insights.

Rights

Copyright © 2017 the author(s)

DC Citation

Proceedings of the Ninth International Driving Symposium on Human Factors in Driver Assessment, Training and Vehicle Design, June 26-29, 2017, Manchester Village, Vermont. Iowa City, IA: Public Policy Center, University of Iowa, 2017: 158-164.

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Jun 28th, 12:00 AM

Voice-Controlled In-Vehicle Systems: Effects of Voice-Recognition Accuracy in the Presence of Background Noise

Manchester Village, Vermont

This paper presents initial findings from a driving simulator studyThis paper presents initial findings from a driving simulator studycomparing user responses to a noise-robust voice-controlled system while drivingto a noise-sensitive one in the presence of background noise. Twenty participantsinteracted with both noise-sensitive and noise-robust simulated voice-controlledinfotainment systems while driving under three background noise conditions (nonoise, music, and children). While both systems were viewed as useful andsatisfying, user acceptance was affected by background noise with the noisesensitivesystem, but not the noise-robust one. There was also no evidence that useracceptance was calibrated by having background noise as a context for varyinglevels of accuracy. No significant differences were observed between the twosystems in driving performance metrics analyzed (average speed, speed variability,and standard deviation of lane position), but the use of either system affecteddriving performance compared to baseline driving. A larger sample size at the endof this study along with the analysis of a larger set of performance metrics willprovide further insights.